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Genius.com

Contributed by Patch Hofweber on Feb 18th, 2016. Artwork published in
August 2015
.
    Genius.com 1
    Source: http://genius.com © 2015 Genius Media Group Inc. License: All Rights Reserved.

    The road for Genius.com (previously Rap Genius) has been rocky. A startup centered around annotating lyrics, they’ve been struggling with bro culture and their graphic identity for years. Kanye West even tried his hand at a redesign.

    “He never actually completed it. If he had, that would have definitely been the new design of Rap Genius.”

    The lackluster logo from an otherwise groundbreaking Kokoro & Moi tells of good intentions but falls short.

    In moving from rapgenius.com to simply genius.com, they wisely replaced Verdana with Whitney for body copy, but the pairing with headline typeface DIN felt off. August 2015 brought the latest redesign. DIN was replaced by Programme, whose versatility shines. The humanistic forms in Whitney and Programme keep continuity. Programme’s dimensions prove it to be perfect for metadata, while careful use of bold stylistic sets hint at formulae in line with the site’s namesake.

    Genius.com 2
    Source: http://genius.com © 2015 Genius Media Group Inc. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Genius.com 3
    Source: http://genius.com © 2015 Genius Media Group Inc. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Genius.com 4
    Source: http://genius.com © 2015 Genius Media Group Inc. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Genius.com 5
    Source: http://genius.com © 2015 Genius Media Group Inc. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Programme
    • Whitney

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    1 Comment on “Genius.com”

    1. Jun 17th, 2019  1:23 pm

      Lyrics site Genius Media accuses Google of lifting its contents. Genius claims it can prove lyrics from its site are appearing in Google search information panels – by examining the apostrophes. From the Wall Street Journal:

      Starting around 2016, Genius said, the company made a subtle change to some of the songs on its website, alternating the lyrics’ apostrophes between straight and curly single-quote marks in exactly the same sequence for every song.

      When the two types of apostrophes were converted to the dots and dashes used in Morse code, they spelled out the words “Red Handed.”

      Here’s what the two glyphs that were used for the typographical watermarking system look like in the Programme typeface:

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