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Ornamented Types introduction and prospectus

Contributed by Stephen Coles on May 7th, 2016. Artwork published in
circa 1990
.
    Prospectus.
    Source: http://imimprimit.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Prospectus.

    “The first complete printing and publication of an unique collection of 23 alphabets of wood-engraved ornamented letters in the collection of the St Bride Printing Library, London; with two additional alphabets.

    The text is hand set in Scotch Roman (Monotype Series 137) with founders’ display types including Fry’s Canon and William Caslon IV’s Egyptian of 1816, which was specially recast [from original matrices found in Stephenson Blake foundry drawers] for this edition at the Oxford University Press.” — I. M. Imprimit

    Title page.
    Source: http://imimprimit.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Title page.

    The Introduction is written by James Mosley, Librarian of the St Bride Printing Library and the custodian of Pouchée’s wood-engraved alphabets.
    Source: http://imimprimit.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    The Introduction is written by James Mosley, Librarian of the St Bride Printing Library and the custodian of Pouchée’s wood-engraved alphabets.

    Prospectus text, set in Scotch Roman Series 137.
    Source: http://imimprimit.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Prospectus text, set in Scotch Roman Series 137.

    Invitation to preview event.
    Source: http://imimprimit.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Invitation to preview event.

    1 Comment on “Ornamented Types introduction and prospectus”

    1. This edition is incredible, and the amazing alphabets are just the appetiser. Mosley and Horsfall’s introduction is hands-down the best history of display typefaces I’ve ever read. Tons of information I’ve never seen elsewhere, and much more surely never this well-explained. It’s sad that it’s only available in such a rare and expensive edition, but some libraries have copies. (The Printing Historical Society has also done reprints of specimens by Matthew Sears and William Davison, many of which are similar in design.)

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