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Pop-up books by Bernard Duisit

Contributed by Matthijs Sluiter on Apr 24th, 2018. Artwork published in
January 2017
.
    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.

    Bernard Duisit is a renowned paper engineer who has worked on dozens of pop-up and interactive books. Thames & Hudson published a series of wimsy pop-up books by Duisit with different illustrators, in which Duisit surprises and entertains kids and grown-ups. Three books of the series are shown here. The narrative is simple and effective: the question on the book cover is repeated in different variations on the left page, and answered with an illustration on the right hand page.

    In the English editions, all typography follows the same design, with titles set in Emigre’s Variex regular weight, with glyphs in different sizes to enhance the rhythm, and some modified glyphs to improve the legibility. All text inside the book is in Meredith Mandel’s succesful freebie Chunk.

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From Can you keep a straight face?

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From Can you keep a straight face?

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Source: https://www.thamesandhudsonusa.com Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From Can you keep a straight face?

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Cover for What’s up? Illustrations by Olivia Cosneau, published January 2017.

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From: What's up?

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Source: https://thamesandhudson.com Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    This or that? Illustrated by Delphine Chedru, published January 2017.

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From This or that?

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From This or that?

    Cover for Can you keep a straight face, with a modified ‘g’ in the title, and a question mark, repurposed as nose. Illustrated by Élisa Géhin. Published january 2017.
    Thames & Hudson. License: All Rights Reserved.

    From This or that?

    Typefaces

    • Variex
    • Chunk

    Formats

    Topics

    Designers/Agencies

    Artwork location

    In Sets

    2 Comments on “Pop-up books by Bernard Duisit”

    1. Cameron Parrish says:
      May 10th, 2018  10:11 pm

      Variex was designed in 1998, as that is what Emigre’s website says.

    2. May 11th, 2018  7:27 am

      Thank you, Cameron! Emigre states it was designed in 1988 — this info can also be found on our typeface page. It appeared in Emigre Magazine No. 15 “Do You Read Me?” from 1990. The 1996 date probably comes from MyFonts. It might indicate the public release date, or the date of a reworked version. Maybe it’s plain wrong. Variex was definitely available in 1996, see archive.org.

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