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Cinefex magazine logo

Contributed by Stephen Coles on May 5th, 2018. Artwork published in .
    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
    Source: http://www.cinefex.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

    Cinefex is a journal covering visual effects in cinema, launched in 1980 by author Don Shay. It’s still published (once quarterly, now bimonthly), and has remained in the family since the beginning. The original nameplate, designed by Shay, has stuck around too. It’s set in Rustikalis with an overline and underline as a reference to a film strip.

    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
    Source: http://www.cinefex.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Number 2, August 1980, featuring Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back.

    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
    Source: http://www.cinefex.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Number 35, August 1988, featuring Who Framed Roger Rabbit?. The only time the logo has appeared in multiple colors.

    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
    Source: http://www.cinefex.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Number 72, December 1997, featuring Titanic.

    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
    Source: http://www.cinefex.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Number 104, January 2006, featuring King Kong.

    Number 1, March 1980, featuring Star Trek: The Motion Picture.
    Source: http://www.cinefex.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Number 151, February 2017, featuring Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

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    3 Comments on “Cinefex magazine logo”

    1. May 6th, 2018  8:43 am

    2. May 6th, 2018  5:09 pm

    3. May 7th, 2018  12:46 am

      Thanks for posting this, Stephen. I’ve been a regular reader of Cinefex since the early issues and have a pretty big collection of them.

      The format has changed very little over the years. Still set in Benguiat Condensed, which I’ve always thought was an odd choice for text, but I don’t even notice it now.

      Incidentally, the original art director of National Lampoon, Michael Gross, went to high school with Don Shay and did a number of projects with him over the years, such as various “making of” books about special effects movies. He also did a minor redesign of Cinefex in 2002.

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