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Buck Owens & The Buckaroos — It Takes People Like You To Make People Like Me

Photo(s) by Bart Solenthaler. Imported from Flickr on Jun 23, 2018. Artwork published in
January 1968
.
    Buck Owens & The Buckaroos — It Takes People Like You To Make People Like Me
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “plymouth”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    In case you were looking for an off-beat album cover, Buck Owens and the Buckaroos have something for you: A weird band name, a confusing album title, a portrait with pinched eyes, a fur coat with a zipper and a grammatically incorrect song title (Where Does The Good Times Go?).

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    • Plymouth
    • Poster Bodoni Compressed

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    6 Comments on “Buck Owens & The Buckaroos — It Takes People Like You To Make People Like Me

    1. Another example of album cover using Plymouth in a more considerate manner (for example alternating the weathered and non-weathered letters) is Elton John’s Tumbleweed Connection.

      [Tumbleweed Connection cover]

      Source: Typography.Guru and Wikipedia (FI) for the picture.

    2. Thanks, Riccardo. Do you want to submit this cover so that we can add a dedicated post to the Collection?

    3. I thought about it, then laziness got the best of me… ;-)

      I’m not really sure it would add much more value as a standalone entry rather than a comment.

      Another use of Plymouth I discovered, perhaps more surprising, is on the covers (and back covers) of one studio album (and its three singles) and two live albums by The Cure.

      But, you know, laziness and all that…

    4. I’m not really sure it would add much more value as a standalone entry

      Oh, it certainly does! For example, imagine someone checking the page for Uses tagged with “Elton John” … as a comment, it won’t show up there. Same if a reader only quickly checks the thumbnails for Plymouth in use. Not to mention the whole thing about meta data and credits – who designed this? when and where? etc. – which is central to our mission. I get that preparing a submission takes a little more effort than writing a comment, but I’d argue the difference is neglegible.

    5. OK, I submitted the entry (for The Cure album covers, I have some difficulties sourcing decent quality images).

    6. Riccardo, you’re the best! Thanks for preparing a submission, it’s much appreciated. In addition to the benefits mentioned above, we now have also an entry for prolific cover designer David Larkham and the first in-use example for Poor Richard. The post has been published today:

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