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Elvis Presley – Please Release Me (1st Records) album art

Contributed by Kay More on Jul 24th, 2019. Artwork published in
October 1970
.
    Elvis Presley – Please Release Me (1st Records) album art
    Source: www.ebay.ie License: All Rights Reserved.

    12″ bootleg album released as 1st Records No. 161 in October 1970. From the typewritten liner notes on the back cover, penned by Barry Silver who is also credited with the album design:

    Please Release Me is an album that just had to be released! For many reasons. Too many to be honest. To name just the most important one: everybody wants the songs and things on this album and they have been waiting too long already. So, why keep them waiting forever and ever and not give them what they want?

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    • Montgomery Pousse Cafe

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    3 Comments on “Elvis Presley – Please Release Me (1st Records) album art”

    1. According to Discogs, the country where this unofficial album is released might be the Netherlands.

    2. Could be also a European copy? Am I right?

    3. I don’t know where this album was released. It’s an unauthorized bootleg record, which means you probably won’t find any reliable contact info on it. The Discogs page doesn’t cite any sources for the claim it originated in the Netherlands. There are currently two vinyl copies available on eBay, one by 1st Records and one by Brookville Records (both from sellers in the U.S., if that’s any indication).

      What I do know is that Montgomery Pousse Cafe was an exclusive face by Photo-Lettering, Inc. and as such was available only from this typesetting house in New York. Sure, it’s possible that it was copied and offered by some European type provider, but I have yet to spot this design in a catalog by anyone other than PLINC.

    4. I know. It is the United States, probably but one copy is from another country. I don’t know where this came from, actually.

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