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Child’s Play (1988)

Contributed by Kent Wheeless on Oct 31st, 2019. Artwork published in .
    Child’s Play (1988) 1
    License: All Rights Reserved.

    Nobody believes 6-year-old Andy Barclay when he says that “Chucky”, his new birthday doll, is alive. And when Andy’s babysitter is violently pushed out the window to her death, the boy tells his mother and the detective the simple truth – “Chucky did it.”

    Child’s Play (1988) ends with the death of Chucky — but for the sake of sequels, the deathly doll was revived for three more Child’s Play movies (1990, 1991, 2019). The initial movie was released with two similar logos.

    The design shown in the first two images uses slightly modified Flyer, with a razor sharp apostrophe and an extended P. Or is it based on Futura Extra Bold? The latter typeface’s curves in the uppercase S look less ‘aggressive’ than in Flyer.

    For the second design, the horror factor was turned up by adding a splash of blood on the tightly spaced letters of the logo which appears to be based on Franklin Gothic Condensed. Letraset had a version where, like in the movie logo, the C has horizontal terminals and the S diagonal ones.

    For blurbs and credits, the designers seem to have used whatever was at hand in their catalogue: Univers, Helvetica, and bits of Futura Condensed.

    Child’s Play (1988) 2
    Source: https://reelrundown.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    Child’s Play (1988) 3
    Source: https://horrormovieproject.blogspot.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    VHS video cover.
    Source: https://vhsrevival.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    VHS video cover.

    Typefaces

    • Flyer
    • Franklin Gothic
    • Univers
    • Helvetica
    • Futura Condensed

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    2 Comments on “Child’s Play (1988)”

    1. Jay Mellor says:
      Oct 31st, 2019  9:42 pm

      Happy Halloween, Florian!

    2. Nov 1st, 2019  8:27 am

      Thank you, and the same to you, Jay!

      Since you posted this here, let me say that Fonts In Use is a collaborative effort. This Use was submitted by Kent (his first!), and extended, honed, and moderated by Matthijs.

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