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Explorer Pass, City of Denver

Contributed by Dan on Jan 20th, 2020. Artwork published in
January 2020
.
    This image celebrates the unusual and iconic architecture of the Denver Art Museum.
    Source: https://dribbble.com Photo: Dan. License: All Rights Reserved.

    This image celebrates the unusual and iconic architecture of the Denver Art Museum.

    These icons are part of a broader series representing various cultural institutions in Denver, Colorado. Evanston Alehouse was selected to evoke a sense of adventure and exploration. The two weights used are 1858 Black and 1858 Medium, with some texture and smoothing added to the letterforms.

    The icon for the Denver Botanic Gardens celebrates the corpse flower that the museum is known for.
    Source: https://dribbble.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    The icon for the Denver Botanic Gardens celebrates the corpse flower that the museum is known for.

    The icon for the Children’s Museum of Denver draws inspiration from the newest installation — a humongous exploration structure called the Adventure Forest. The central feather is the actual logo for the Adventure Forest, and the accompanying symbols are found throughout the structure.
    Source: https://dribbble.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    The icon for the Children’s Museum of Denver draws inspiration from the newest installation — a humongous exploration structure called the Adventure Forest. The central feather is the actual logo for the Adventure Forest, and the accompanying symbols are found throughout the structure.

    This icon features a ceramic pitcher created by a Pueblan craftsperson living at Mesa Verde circa 900–1150 AD. The triangle and dot motifs are other elements common in hand made items from this location and time period. My reference for this artwork was an actual display at the History Colorado Center in Denver.
    Source: https://dribbble.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    This icon features a ceramic pitcher created by a Pueblan craftsperson living at Mesa Verde circa 900–1150 AD. The triangle and dot motifs are other elements common in hand made items from this location and time period. My reference for this artwork was an actual display at the History Colorado Center in Denver.

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    • Evanston Alehouse

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