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Ditto Inc. logo and packaging

Contributed by Stephen Coles on Mar 23rd, 2020. Artwork published in .
    Ditto Inc. logo and packaging 1
    Source: https://archive.org American Trademark Designs, Dover Publications, 1976. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Ditto Inc, founded in 1910 and later a division of Bell & Howell, Inc., manufactured duplication equipment, such as spirit duplicators. Ditto machines became so popular in American offices and schools it became a generic noun/verb — one would “ditto” something to make a copy.

    This 1958 redesign of the Ditto logo, using Bulletin Typewriter almost directly, is credited in Barbara Baer Capitman’s American Trademark Designs, (Dover, 1976) to Morton Goldsholl of Morton Goldholl Associates (though this book often attributes work to firm owners rather than specific designers). The straight double-quotes ("), as seen on a typewriter and common shorthand for repetition, were used in the logo and as a pattern motif for packaging.

    Ditto direct process fluid tin, undated.
    Source: http://rover.ebay.com Image: Collectibles1800. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Ditto direct process fluid tin, undated.

    Design for Ditto direct process fluid tin, 1961.
    Source: https://www.commarts.com Image: Communication Arts. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Design for Ditto direct process fluid tin, 1961.

    Ditto masterset packaging, undated.
    Source: http://rover.ebay.com Image: AbaGee. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Ditto masterset packaging, undated.

    Ad for Ditto duplication machine, 1965.
    Source: http://www.officemuseum.com Image: Early Office Museum. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Ad for Ditto duplication machine, 1965.

    Typefaces

    • Bulletin Typewriter
    • Murray Hill Gothic

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    3 Comments on “Ditto Inc. logo and packaging”

    1. Interestingly, double-tick symbols were used as ditto marks long before they were used to mark quotations, going back as far as cuneiform tablets from the Iron Age.

      I also just learned there is a dedicated DITTO MARK (U+03003) character in Unicode.

    2. Interesting! Is it specifically used in Asian scripts, or is it part of the CJK SYMBOLS block for another reason?

    3. The 'quotation mark as ditto’ came up recently in a work meeting. Thought of this wordmark. Looks like a use of Murray Hill Gothic on the last image.

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