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“The New Singer Vibrator!” handbill

Photo(s) by Alan Mays. Imported from Flickr on Jul 10, 2020. Artwork published in
circa 1890
.
    “The New Singer Vibrator!” handbill
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Alan Mays and tagged with “frenchantiqueextended”, “egyptianextracondensed” and “pynson”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    A handbill extolling the virtues of the Singer Vibrator, which was advertised as a “new” sewing machine in newspapers and magazines beginning around 1888.

    David Bachman Landis of Pluck Art Printery (later known as Landis Art Press) printed this piece.

    Before buying a sewing machine, it will pay you to call and examine
    The New Singer Vibrator!
    You will find it the lightest running and simplest constructed machine in the market.
    A full supply of needles, oils, and parts for all sewing machines.
    Repairing promptly attended to.
    Singer Manufacturing Co., Stevens House Block, No. 4 South Prince St., Lancaster, Pa.
    Chris. Myers, agent.
    Pluck Print

    “The New” uses caps from a French Antique/Clarendon Extended, and “Before buying” appears to be Latin Antique. “Singer Vibrator” is No. 500, which was first shown as wood type by William H. Page in 1890. “Lightest Running” is Egyptian Extra Condensed, while “Needles, Oil and Parts” is set in Pynson. There’s also a Ionic, Old Style Bold, as well as five more typefaces that have not been tracked down yet.

    Typefaces

    • No. 500 (Page)
    • Latin Antique
    • French Antique/Clarendon Extended
    • Gothic No. 122
    • Peerless
    • Egyptian Extra Condensed
    • Pynson
    • Colgate
    • Clarendon/Ionic
    • Old Style Bold
    • unidentified typeface

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    1 Comment on ““The New Singer Vibrator!” handbill”

    1. The partly descending caps with decorative dots are from Peerless, and the “hairy” typeface for “Singer Manufacturing Co.” is called Colgate. Both were issued by Barnhart Brothers & Spindler in the 1880s.

      “Chris. Myers, Agent.” seems to match the 12-point size of Gothic No. 122. This is probably the same face as used for the third line.

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