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The Haunting of Drumroe by Claudette Nicole (Fawcett Gold Medal, 1971)

Contributed by Christopher Bentley on Jan 15th, 2022. Artwork published in .
    The Haunting of Drumroe by Claudette Nicole (Fawcett Gold Medal, 1971)
    Source: www.flickr.com Ron and Sandra Lightburn. License: All Rights Reserved.

    This is a follow-up on my previous contribution about Diabolus by David St. John, posted with the permission of Ron Lightburn. Ron enquired about the typeface used for another Fawcett publication with front cover artwork by Jeff Jones. I have identified the main text in yellow as Staudel Xenotype J, with the ancillary text in white being set in Edel Grotesk/Aurora Grotesk VI-VII, identified via a previous contribution of mine, the cover artwork for Salena Jones and Mieko Hirota at the Zlatniyat Orfey of 1973.

    According to Fantastic Fiction, Claudette Nicole’s The Haunting of Drumroe dates from the same year. However, I am taking the cue from Ron and Sandra Lightburn’s Flickr post, where the year of publication is stated as 1971. If there are Fonts In Use readers who know which year is the correct one I would like to hear from them.

    [More info on ISFDB]

    Typefaces

    • Staudel Xenotype J
    • Trade Gothic Extended

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    2 Comments on “The Haunting of Drumroe by Claudette Nicole (Fawcett Gold Medal, 1971)”

    1. The Internet Speculative Fiction Database – which is a great and reliable source for this sort of things – dates this book to 1971, too.

      There, I also learned that Claudette Nicole is a pseudonym used by author Jon Messmann (d. 2004).

      Edel Grotesk comes indeed very close, but the wide sans is in fact Trade Gothic Extended. There are a number of minor differences: in Edel-Grotesk, a is tailed, C has a smaller aperture, Y has a lower joint, and S a higher middle part.

    2. Well, I nearly got all the way there!

      I suppose using a font with the word ‘Gothic’ in it is sort of very fitting for a Gothic novel, so that’s perhaps a better choice despite the personal disappointment at not being quite the font expert that I thought!

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